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The Third Day of Stitchmas!

Updated: Dec 4, 2021








This is Karin saying, Welcome to Stitchmas Day 3!


  1. Sewing Machine Needles in Bulk


I learned something very important while making vinyl pouches for our boutique: You can never have too many sewing needles, and that it is cheaper to buy them in bulk (did you know that you could buy them this way? I didn't). If you have a size that you use more of than others, say for quilting, or garment sewing, it is really nice to be able to change your needles often. I purchased a little box of 100 super non-stick sewing machine needles for working with vinyl, and it was so nice to have them on hand while reducing the extra packaging that would have taken up space in the box I keep my needles in. I'll be buying my needles this way from now on!



2. Gravity Feed Iron and IV Stand















While I agree with Kaity that having a little cordless iron nearby is all kinds of wonderful, I also love the workhorse that is a gravity feed iron. A gallon of water hangs above the ironing space, feeding water for steam into the iron. It is heavy, but this makes it ideal for pressing, and it takes a long time to work through a gallon of water. It isn't portable like the cordless, but I love not having to refill my iron so often through a project. Please note, though the filters are supposed to last 3-ish months, we have very hard water here at the studio, and the first filter only lasted a few weeks. I'm using store-brand bottled water now to save the cost of replacing the filters so often. The IV stand is sold separately, and is optional if you have another way of hanging your water 3ft above your ironing surface.


3. Building Pattern - The Architecture of Women's Clothing by Suzy Furrer


For garment sewists, this book is foundational to altering existing patterns and creating your own. The paperback is offered at a ridiculously high price on Amazon, but the ebook pdf is only $29.99 from Apparel Arts, where Suzy Furrer is the founder and director. You can also take a Craftsy class (Patternmaking Basics: The Bodice Sloper), like I did, if you want to break it down to learn specific garment connstruction. The book has so much information that it can seem a little overwhelming, so I started by working through the garment chapters such as sleeves to help me adapt a pattern that I already had. If you are or know someone is loves to live their creativity in clothing, this is a must-have resource!


Happy Shopping!

-Karin


PS: For other great gift ideas, check out our Handmade Holiday Boutique!

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